automated vitals capture.

l

forget drawing graphs.

Consider the time spent on plotting vital signs and handwriting comments. Don’t use your critical time on these tasks.
g

forget copying vital trends

Didn’t have enough time to look at the patient monitor?  Take advantage of continuous high resolution electronic data capture.

High resolution data capture

No need to look at five minute averages. Recordation captures a full data set every second for critical analysis of events.

FOCUS ON PATIENT CARE

Let Recordation perform tedious tasks like data capture, demographics aggregation and documentation validation.

handwritten vs. electronic.

Handwritten anesthetic records are unlikely or unable to represent physiologic data with consistent accuracy at high resolution. Many electronic anesthesia recording systems capture data and save averaged values over five minute periods.

Retrospective analysis of intraoperative events may be challenging with handwritten records or averaged electronic data, and may lead to inaccurate conclusions or missed learning opportunities from quality assurance or medicolegal investigations.

Recordation Workstation captures and saves up to one hundred numeric parameters at a typical frequency of once per second; this can prove critical in analyzing intraoperative events.

In the following example, Recordation Workstation show the same event in different ways with vital signs captured around an injection of local anesthetic with epinephrine.

↑ Local Anesthetic Injection
← Blood Pressure
↑ Local Anesthetic Injection
← Blood Pressure
↑ Local Anesthetic Injection
← Blood Pressure
↑ Local Anesthetic Injection
← Blood Pressure
↑ Local Anesthetic Injection
← Blood Pressure
Conduction Block ↓
Vital signs are displayed at 30 minute intervals, with blood pressure values averaged over five minute epochs.
Vital signs are displayed at 15 minute intervals, with blood pressure values averaged over five minute epochs. Note the highlighted Blood Pressure.
As the time interval is displayed as ten minutes with blood pressures averaged over two minutes, the heart rate and blood pressure changes become more obvious.
The horizontal time scale is displayed at five minute intervals, with verbatim blood pressures and heart rates as they are received in real time.
Second-per-second readings for heart rate (Yellow tracing: SpO2 derived; Red tracing: EKG derived), are shown.
The injection of local anesthetic with epinephrine [Arrow 1] with likely rapid absorption. The initial heart rate and pulse increase [Arrow 2], followed by an EKG heart rate increase with 1:2 conduction of SpO2 heart rate [Arrow 3], with increased blood pressure and the addition of isoflurane for arterial vasodilation [Arrow 4].

high resolution data capture.

Recordation Workstation, by capturing and saving physiologic data at the highest resolution, typically captures up to one hundred numeric parameters per second, can be used to understand more reliably intraoperative events.

high resolution data capture.

Recordation Workstation, by capturing and saving physiologic data at the highest resolution, typically captures up to one hundred numeric parameters per second, can be used to understand more reliably intraoperative events.

disadvantages of Handwritten Anesthesia records.

Time consuming. Tedious. Inaccurate. Illegible. Distracting.

Unable to be validated with respect to accuracy, time of entry of individual documentation elements.

Rely on the clinician’s viewing and interpretation of patient monitor.

Limited simultaneous access to handwritten information by others.

Loss of clinically relevant information.[reference]

Subject to medicolegal challenge.

Lack electronically extractable meaningful data.

More importantly, what is the cost of not having easily accessible electronic anesthesia information?

have we evolved?

Despite the presence of low cost computer technology, the adoption of automated anesthetic recording systems has been slow.

monitor evolution.

Patient monitors have undergone significant evolution, although for many years even some older models have been able to output data electronically at high rates.

interoperability nightmare.

Anesthesia information recording systems must interface with many different physiologic models, often in the same operating room suites, using communication protocols that may no longer be supported or are difficult to maintain in modern computer operating systems and environments.

let's get together.

We have the ability to obtain high quality data at high acquisition rates from older and more modern models using a variety of communications protocols. Let us know what monitoring equipment you have in your operating rooms!

WHICH ANESTHESIA RECORD WOUlD BE EASIER TO DEFEND?

Good medical care that is documented appropriately is the easiest to defend.

Arguments have been made that capturing vital signs electronically subjects the user to increased medicolegal liability. However just as a pilot’s flight recorder can be used retrospectively to understand the flight crew’s environment and how it might have been experienced, so too can a high resolution electronic anesthesia record such as those from Recordation Workstation be used for meaningful analyses and data aggregation.

In every case, and especially following an adverse outcome, or if liability claims are made against the anesthesia team with or without justification, the anesthesia record becomes the “flight recorder.” While Recordation Workstation presents most data averaged over 5 minute intervals, because the original raw data is saved with each anesthetic record, it may be reformatted at a later time to display at one minute or one second intervals for closer scrutiny. 

Given that written records may pose legibility and validation challenges, the advantages become clear of appropriate medical care that is documented accurately with automated high resolution physiologic data.

see how easy anesthesia EHR will be.

Discuss your practice and your facility with our experts.

Recordation, Inc. 

Recordation Perioperative Information Systems
30 Boston Post Road
Wayland, MA 01778

Copyright © 2017 by Recordation, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

 


Contact Information.

tel: (800)-418-1587
fax: (508) 532-4912

solutions@recordation.com